The chairman of the British Unionist Party, Robert McCartney, reportedly rejected the power-sharing agreements in the new agreement, which were deemed undemocratic. [3] In short, this is not an agreement. But in an attempt to avoid another humiliation, such as the one that followed the Kent Castle talks in 2004, the government decided this time to put the cart in front of the horse and explain the victory in advance! The Provisional IRA announces the end of its armed campaign (2005) Blair and Ahern`s agreement to restore decentralisation (2006) The St Andrews Agreement (2006) The Journey (2016 film) In the weeks following the agreement between Paisley and Adams, the four parties – dUP, Féin, UUP and SDLP – gave their choice to the executive ministries. The Assembly met on 8 May 2007 and elected Ian Paisley and Martin McGuinness as Premier and Deputy Prime Minister. It also ratified the ten ministers appointed by their parties. On 12 May, Sinn Féin Ard Chomhairle agreed to hold three seats on the police committee and appointed three MLAs to take. In fact, the whole document bears the sign of this contradiction. On the one hand, it tries to set strict limits on what institutions can actually do. But on the other hand, everything is formulated in the most vague form possible which, in itself, probably reflects the degree of “agreement” to which London and Dublin thought they could get the parts of Northern Ireland to do so – in fact, that is a minimum. In the parliamentary elections, the DUP and Sinn Féin won both seats and thus consolidated their position as the two main parties in the Assembly. Peter Hain signed the order to restore the institutions on March 25 and warned that the meeting would be closed if the parties did not reach an agreement before midnight the next day. DuP and Sinn Féin members, led by Ian Paisley and Gerry Adams, met for the first time in person on 26 March and agreed to form an executive on 8 May, with the DUP firmly committing to entering government with Sinn Féin.

Tony Blair and Bertie Ahern welcomed the agreement. On 27 March, the emergency law was presented to the British Parliament to facilitate the six-week delay. The St Andrews Agreement No 2 was passed without a vote in the House of Commons and the House of Lords and obtained royal approval, such as the Northern Ireland (St Andrews Agreement) Act 2007, that evening. The St Andrews Agreement (Irish: Comhaonté Chill R`mhinn; Ulster Scots: St Andra`s `Greement, St Andrew`s Greeance[1] or St Andrae`s Greeance[2]) is an agreement between the British and Irish governments and the political parties in Northern Ireland on the decentralisation of power in the region. The agreement was the result of multi-party discussions that took place from 11 to 13 October 2006 in St Andrews, Fife, Scotland, between the two governments and all the major parties in Northern Ireland, including the two largest parties, the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) and Sinn Féin. It led to the re-establishment of the Northern Ireland Assembly, the formation (on 8 May 2007) of a new executive power in Northern Ireland and a decision by Sinn Féin to support the Northern Ireland Police Service, the courts and the rule of law.

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